Breaking Your Pit Bull Terrier’s Jumping Habit: Dog Training Help

As you have probably already learned, Pit Bulls are highly energetic animals. They love to run and play, and get excited easily. One of the more annoying habits they develop at a young age is jumping. Jumping can be particularly annoying when they do it as a way of greeting, especially if it is young child or someone who is afraid of dogs. Teaching your Pit Bull to curb this behavior is not an easy task, but is your responsibility as a Pit Bull owner.

Many people have stopped their Pit Bulls from jumping on them by using treats. When they come inside, they throw some treats on the floor, and then greet their dog while his attention is fixed on the treats. The treats usually work as a good distraction to pull your Pit Bull’s attention away from jumping on you. If you don’t like using treats to train your Pit Bull, or if the method just doesn’t work well for you, then you have to try other ideas to train your Pit Bull not to jump.

One thing you can try is teaching your Pit Bull that it is nicer to sit than jump. Go outside, leaving your Pit Bull inside, then come back in and calmly greet him. If your Pit Bull starts to jump on you, turn your back to him, and ignore him. When your Pit Bull puts all four feet back on the floor, turn back around and pet him. If he starts to jump on you again, turn back around and ignore him. This will teach your Pit Bull that when he jumps, he doesn’t get any attention, but that if he sits nicely you will pet him. This technique may take quite a while for your Pit Bull to learn, especially if he is a very excitable dog. But, if you stick with it long enough, he should learn that jumping is not going to gain him anything other than losing your attention. Once you get your Pit Bull thru this step, try to teach him to sit still for a few moments before you acknowledge him. If he gets up, use the same routine of ignoring him, and then when he sits down, pet him again. This would also be a good time to try to teach him to shake hands when he greets people, rather than jumping on them.

You can also further entice your Pit Bull to not jump by tempting him and then rewarding and praising him for his good behavior. Hold treats up in the air so that your Pit Bull will have to jump to get them. If he jumps, ignore him, and when he is calm try again. When he is able to remain seated, praise him, give him the treats, and some extra attention. He will soon learn that by behaving the way you want him to, he will not only get extra attention, but some extra treats as well, which is double incentive for him to obey.

Another method that tends to work well in teaching your Pit Bull not to jump is to have a designated place for your Pit Bull, and teach him to go there when you need him to, for example, when someone is at the door. To start this training, you will need to pick the spot, and put maybe a bed or blanket and some of his favorite toys there. When the spot is ready, spend some time with him while he is there. Giving him special attention and treats will help him attribute the spot as a good place that he wants to spend time at. As your Pit Bull becomes accustomed to his place, start sending him there occasionally. At first, you will want to be close to the spot, and eventually move farther and farther away from it as your dog learns. Make it a point to give him special attention and treats each time he goes to his spot when you ask him to. Eventually, your Pit Bull will learn that by going to his spot when you ask him to, that you will reward him for it.

The biggest thing you can do to help your Pit Bull learn not to jump is to keep your own greetings calm. I know it is hard when you have been away from him all day not to come in and play and wrestle with him, but this will only get him more excited, and he will expect this same attention from everyone that enters the house. Until you can completely break the jumping habit, it may be best to ignore him for the first few minutes you come home, and then play with him once he settles down. It may take a little time, but your Pit Bull will soon learn how to tone down his excitement.

How To Spot A Great Pit Bull Breeder: 7 Signs Of A Good Dog Breeder

If you’re searching for a Pit Bull terrier puppy but are unsure about where to look for one, this is an important article for you to read. Many people are afraid to ask questions when they speak with breeders and this is the first hurdle that you need to get over. It is vital for you to ask questions when you are speaking with different breeders. Below is a list that I’ve created of some very important things you should look for and ask of the Pit Bull terrier breeders you’re considering doing business with.

1. Does the breeder breed several different types of dogs? This can often be a red flag and you should try to stick with breeders who only work with American Pit Bull Terriers.

2. A responsible Pit Bull breeder will be able to tell you the negative characteristics and health issues of his breeding line and also what he has done over the years to improve that aspect of his dogs.

3. Can the breeder thoroughly explain to you how he selects dogs for breeding and what characteristics they will most likely throw?

4. How often does the breeder have litters of puppies? Breeders who have many, many litters each year may not be a good choice.

5. Is the breeder involved with Pit Bulls on a larger scale than just breeding them?.

6. Does the breeder keep in touch with those who have purchased puppies from him? Breeders who sell pups and then have no idea where they end up should be avoided.

7. Where does the breeder keep his puppies at before they are sold? Are they well socialized?

There are many other things that you could ask the Pit Bull breeders that you speak with, however the above list will give you an excellent start and greatly improve the chances that you’ll end up with an excellent Pit Bull terrier puppy.

American Pit Bull Terrier: Is It The Right Dog Breed For You?

If you’re thinking about owning a Pit Bull terrier, it is important to understand the characteristics of the breed as well as your current lifestyle. Caring for a Pit Bull is a long-term commitment that needs to be taken seriously, not just a simple hobby that you participate in when time permits.

Unfortunately it is very difficult for many dogs to find a second home in the event that their owners “change their minds” and decide they don’t want a dog after all. The situation is even worse for Pit Bulls due to their reputation in today’s society.

Do you have the time and the energy to commit to a high energy breed such as a Pit Bull? Pit Bull terriers have very high exercise requirements and are happiest when they get plenty of play time.

If you are interested in owning a Pit Bull, you should possess a similar sense of adventure. A day at the beach, a park, or just playing frisbee in the backyard are all excellent things to do with your four-legged friend. These activities will also strengthen the bond between you and your dog and make ownership even more rewarding.

If you’re more of an inside person however and don’t enjoy exercising daily, you should seriously rethink your idea of Pit Bull ownership. There are many other excellent dog breeds that will probably be more suitable to your lifestyle and it isn’t fair to penalize your dog simply because you are too selfish to get an alternative breed.

If you still are set on owning a Pit Bull, it is important that you begin training your dog as soon as you bring him home. Pit Bulls who aren’t properly trained can become more than a handful. On the other hand, a well-trained Pit can regularly impress others with good behavior.

The Loyal Working Companion Dog: American Pit Bull Terrier

This breed of dog, also fondly called as APBT, is known for its loyalty and intelligence. The dogs with this breed make excellent companions since they are very aggressive because of their protective nature.

How, then, are they different from the Staffies? For the UKC or the United Kennel Club, Staffies and APBT are of the same breed but many disapprove of this suggestion. For instance, if the American Kennel Club has an American Staffordshire terrier, it will be registered as an American pit bull terrier by the United Kennel Club. Furthermore, many breeders noted that their lineages have been separate for a long time already for these dogs to be still considered as having the same variety.

Meanwhile, the American Kennel Club does not register a UKC-listed American pit as an American Staffie. In order to gain dual-registry, the dog must initially be recorded as an AKC American Staffie before it can be listed with the UKC as an American pit bull, and not the other way around.

The following are some of the basic facts breeders would really love to know about APTBs:

Category: Terrier

Living Environment: either outdoor or indoor

Coat: smooth, shiny, thick, and short

Colors: color varies

Height: between 18 and 22 inches

Weight: between 30 and 60 pounds

Temperament: courageous, full of energy, and loyal; should be socialized early on with other animals especially with children

Health Issues: heart murmurs and mange

Care and Exercise:
• Bathe when necessary.
• Brush their coat only occasionally using a brush with firm bristles.
• Rub down their coat with a towel or a chamois to remove hairs that are loose.
• Their physique requires a regular exercise routine which includes a daily play time and/or running along a bicycle while on a leash.
• They should be on leash while walking in public places.

Origin/History:

The ancestors of APBT came to the US in the mid-1800s with some Irish-Boston immigrants. Like the Staffie, they were originally bred from bulldogs and terriers. Since APBT is a forerunner to the Staffie, it was also molded to be a fighting dog. However, the Americans made their variety some pounds heavier and trained them to have a more powerful head.

Bull baiting and dog baiting were prohibited in England so bull terriers were no longer bred for bouts. It is in America where the pit bull also gained its popularity for many uses and reasons like:

1. It was used to embody the country in one WW1 artwork.
2. Well-known companies like the Buster Brown Shoe Company and even RCA used the breed as mascots.
3. Petie, a pitbull, was one of the stars in, “Our Gang”, a well sought children’s TV series.
4. A mix breed called Stubby was transformed into a popular and decorated WW1 hero.
5. Pits became good companies of pioneer families on their journeys.
6. Jack, a working pit bulldog was owned by Laura Wilder of lines of books called “Little House”.
7. Popular people like Helen Keller and US President Theodore Roosevelt owned the variety.

Here is some history about the cause of dilemma regarding the registries of APBTs.

In 1898, the United Kennel Club or UKC was structured to provide fighting guidelines and registration for APBT as fighting dogs. Later, there were breeders who shun away from dog fighting so they asked the AKC to recognize their pits so they would be fit for performance events like dog shows. In 1935, the AKC approved of their petitions but the dogs were registered as Staffordshire Terriers, naming them after the little province in England that the breed was known to have originated from. Thus, many breeders have dogs that have dual-registry.

It is interesting to note that Petie, which was one of the stars in the, “Our Gang” TV series was the first breed that was dual-registered to be Staffordshire Terrier/Pit Bull. However, the UKC later started registering other performing-type varieties and they also began holding dog shows comparable to those of the American Kennel Club.

The AKC soon sealed its studbooks to APBTs. They allocated registration to those pit breeds with lineages that are listed as Staffies. For a little time during the 1970s, the AKC disclosed the American pits to their studbooks.

In 1973, the American KC decided to add the word “American” with the pit’s name to discriminate it from a Staffie. At present, those dogs with mixed APTB-StaffIe parents are recognized by UKC and even the American Dog Breeders’ Association as “American pits or American pit bull terriers”.

Nowadays, the pit has employed as search and rescuers, police/armed service dogs, livestock workers, and even as therapy animals because they are good as companions and working dogs.

Moreover, the variety can even compete in dog sports such as herding, obedience, and conformation, French Ring, and Schutzhund. Breeds of this type can be very loving as pets for everyone. The physical demands and harshness of various activities developed a healthy, strong, and stable animal.

If you want to have an APBT as a pet, be sure that the puppy is handled well and properly socialized. A solid and good training will surely produce an obedient, tranquil, and good companion or even a working dog!

How To Choose A Healthy Pit Bull Puppy: Stick To Reputable Dog Breeders

Deciding to add a Pit Bull terrier to the family is a big step. You should have already done research on the breed to learn the characteristics that Pits possess, and you should have also decided on a male of female. Once you’ve tackled those hurdles, it is time for the next step… finding the perfect puppy for your family.

The best way that I would suggest for finding great puppies is to check with your local American Pit Bull Terrier club. Get in touch with the club’s president and find out when the club meets. Attend a meeting, get to know some of the members, and begin asking around for breeder recommendations.

Alternatively, you can buy dog magazines and go through the breeder listings contained in the resources section. Take some time to call the breeders who you are interested in possibly working with, and spend a brief while on the telephone with them. Ask them questions such as:

- How long have you been actively breeding Pit Bulls?
- How long have you been involved with the breed?
- How many litters per year do you have?
- Where are your puppies kept?
- Are your puppies socialized?
- Etc.

You can also contact your veterinarian and ask them for a referral. A vet will typically know the health of a breeder’s lines, so they can be a great source of inside info.

You most certainly want to stay away from pet shops and puppy mills. In most cases, these sources obtain their puppies from a variety of places and it is nearly impossible to know if they come from healthy bloodlines or not. Also, these shops often charge large amounts of money for their dogs and prey on the uneducated, spur-of-the-moment dog buyer..

Lastly, be sure not to buy a puppy from the first breeder you meet and don’t buy the first puppy that you see. All puppies are cute. Spend time with many puppies so you can see the differences in their personalities and you’ll make a more educated choice I assure you.